Tony Karrer's eLearning Blog on e-Learning Trends eLearning 2.0 Personal Learning Informal Learning eLearning Design Authoring Tools Rapid e-Learning Tools Blended e-Learning e-Learning Tools Learning Management Systems (LMS) e-Learning ROI and Metrics

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Physics Lectures

I had seen these physics lectures before, but I was reminded via Stephen Downes and the NY Times article about professor Lewin's lectures and was telling someone about them just the other day. Thought I should definitely point you to them. I personally am compelled by watching something like Planet Earth. Professor Lewin has managed to create something akin to that experience on a topic that can be made extremely boring by most professors.

You can find his lectures on: ocw.mit.edu, including electrostatics, mechanics, vibrations and waves. If you can't sit still for a whole lecture, then you can find a few of them on YouTube - see form of a battery.

Now I'm curious if it wouldn't be better to have students watch these and then go have a discussion with their physics professor after. Or why have them take physics at their local university at all.

3 comments:

Robert said...

I understand the last paragraph of Tony's post like this: "wouldn't students be better off watching college lectures on TV, and then go have a discussion with the professor after? Or better yet, don't sign up for college science courses at all!"

To the first question, I would answer with an analogy: wouldn't it be better to watch Yo Yo Ma give a concert on TV (or streaming video), and then meet the virtuoso afterwards to talk about his playing? If you're even thinking about replying yes, you need to get out more.

To the second question I would reply with this observation: the new leadership in science and math is taking root overseas. Not just the leadership, but the critical mass of talent as well. The primary reason is that science and math are sought by students in colleges overseas, while a large percentage of US students have their faces buried in the mashed potatoes. That's an immortal phrase of Linda Ronstadt.

Bilim ve Teknoloji said...

Thank you

Bilim Haberleri said...

To the second question I would reply with this observation: the new leadership in science and math is taking root overseas. Not just the leadership, but the critical mass of talent as well.