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Wednesday, February 08, 2006

Solo vs. Group, Aggregation - The Problem w/ Blogs

Yikes - this is a really messy stuff.

I want to thank Bill Bruck for his thoughts on my last post. And, he inspired me because our recent exchange highlighted the problem of Solo vs. Group that I wrote about in my last post.

Here's the quick scenario:
  • I make a post about the problems I'm having getting various Web 2.0 tools to match my specific needs.
  • Bill somehow finds my post - so at least part of this stuff is working. :)
  • Bill wants to comment on the post. But he also wants to make the readers of his blog ( aware of the discussion because it may have interest. So he does the natural thing. He puts a brief comment with a link to my article on his blog and then he has to copy the comment onto my blog (because my readers would also be interested).
  • I see the comment, its quite interesting, and I want to respond. So I add my own comment, only to realize that now I have to copy it in two places.

The bottom line problem is that a Blog is really aimed at linear presentation of material in a single location to a particular group (the readership). Bill and I just tried to do two things that Blogs really are not good at: combining information from multiple locations & handling groups in a more dynamic fashion. Ideally, we would have some mechanism to on this topic basis combine our readership groups, combine the discussion. When we were "done" with the discussion, the content would be owned by both groups.

This is some pretty basic stuff. Am I a fool to be writing a blog if I want to actually exchange ideas?

Keywords: eLearning 2.0, Web 2.0

1 comment:

Bill Bruck said...

Of course blog afficionados will say blogs are great for conversation - I tend to disagree.

I don't know if I posted this in our earlier exchange, but I looked at the Tivo community the other day (I'm a Tivo fanatic). They do something that seems pretty reasonable to me.

There's a blog for news - and there are a few comments on blog posts.

There's a discussion board for - well - discussions - exchanges of tips on how to use Tivo, developers exchanging techniques and bug reports - all sorts of stuff.

Humm. Blogs for publishing; discussion boards for discussing!

(I'm prolly repeating what I said before, so forgive.)